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Animal News

"Pet" chimp raises many questions amid tragedy

Published 02/17/09

In the wake of a brutal attack by a pet chimpanzee on a Connecticut woman, people are asking what went wrong. But that, a wildlife expert says, is the wrong question. “What we should examine is, ‘Should people be keeping chimpanzees at home?’” wildlife biologist and Animal Planet TV host Jeff Corwin told Today’s Matt Lauer Tuesday.

Experts try to explain pet chimp’s rampage
Mike Celizic
MSNBC


Ducking out of the Ringling Trial

Published 02/06/09

Kenneth Feld, the sole owner of Feld Entertainment and Ringling Bros. Barnum and Bailey Circus did not appear in U.S Federal Court today. Buying his way out of trouble is a way of life for Ken Feld, but this time, he just may be trapped. These animal rights people are not clowning around!

Reckoning at Ringling Bros.
Leslie Griffith
The Huffington Post


Ringling Trial Begins

Published 02/04/09

A federal judge began hearing a lawsuit alleging the abuse of circus elephants, including the use of heavy chains, tethers and sharp tools called bullhooks.

Learn more about the trial at www.bornfreeusa.org/ringling.

Judge hears case alleging circus elephant abuse
Paul Courson
CNN


Sacramento group among plaintiffs in groundbreaking case

Published 02/03/09

Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus and its parent company, Feld Entertainment, Inc., will finally stand trial to face charges that the circus mistreats its Asian elephants in violation of the federal Endangered Species Act. The case is more than eight years in the making.

On Wednesday (Feb. 4), the plaintiffs, including Sacramento-based non-profit Born Free USA united with Animal Protection Institute (Born Free), the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, Animal Welfare Institute, the Fund for Animals, and former Ringling Bros. employee Tom Rider are scheduled to present their case in federal district court in Washington, D.C. Katherine Meyer of the public interest law firm Meyer Glitzenstein & Crystal will serve as lead counsel for the plaintiffs.

Ringling Brothers Circus on trial for elephant abuse
Gary Bogue
"Pets and Wildlife"
Bay Area News Group


Lawsuit Challenges Iconic Image of Circus Elephants

Published 02/02/09

One of the most iconic images of American life, that of circus elephants joined trunk-to-tail as they lumber along to delight “children of all ages,” as the old saying goes, is about to be debated in a courtroom. Are the beasts docile because they are highly intelligent and respond well to training, reinforced with the promise of apples, carrots, water and kindness at day’s end? Or do they obey because their spirits have been broken and they fear getting hit by their trainers? These are among the questions that will be asked when a lawsuit by a coalition of animal rights’ groups [including Born Free USA united with API] against the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey circus and its parent company opens in federal court on Wednesday.

Suit Challenges Image of Circus Elephants as Willing Performers
David Stout
The New York Times


Ringling Trial Set to Begin

Published 01/28/09

"An animal abuse trial against Feld Entertainment, the parent company of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, is set to begin next week in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C."

For more on Born Free USA united with API's involvement in this landmark case, which will be heard beginning February 3 before U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan, click here.

Trial set on treatment of circus elephants
Natalie Neysa Alund
Bradenton Herald

It takes upwards of 20 years for a family who has lost its kin to rebuild

Published 01/21/09

An African elephant never forgets — especially when it comes to the loss of its kin, according to researchers at the University of Washington. Their findings, published online in the journal, Molecular Ecology, reveal that the negative effects of poaching persist for decades after the killing has ended.

Born Free USA has long recognized the damage poaching has done to elephant populations, as discussed in this recent article.

Orphaned Elephants Forced To Forge New Bonds Decades After Ivory Ban
Science Daily

Harvesting Animals Results in a Smaller, Weaker Harvest

Published 01/13/09

Human actions are increasing the rate of evolutionary change in plants and animals in ways that may hurt their long-term prospects for survival, scientists are reporting. Hunting, commercial fishing and some conservation regulations, like minimum size limits on fish, may all work against species health. Reproducing at a younger age and smaller size allowed organisms to leave offspring before they were caught or killed. But some evidence suggests that they may not reproduce as well. Fish that are reproducing earlier “on average have far, far, far fewer eggs than those who wait an additional year and grow a few more centimeters.”

Born Free USA has long maintained that hunting to “manage” wildlife is counterproductive.

Research Ties Human Acts to Harmful Rates of Species Evolution
Cornelia Dean
The New York Times

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