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Harvesting Animals Results in a Smaller, Weaker Harvest

Published 01/13/09

Human actions are increasing the rate of evolutionary change in plants and animals in ways that may hurt their long-term prospects for survival, scientists are reporting. Hunting, commercial fishing and some conservation regulations, like minimum size limits on fish, may all work against species health. Reproducing at a younger age and smaller size allowed organisms to leave offspring before they were caught or killed. But some evidence suggests that they may not reproduce as well. Fish that are reproducing earlier “on average have far, far, far fewer eggs than those who wait an additional year and grow a few more centimeters.”

Born Free USA has long maintained that hunting to “manage” wildlife is counterproductive.

Research Ties Human Acts to Harmful Rates of Species Evolution
Cornelia Dean
The New York Times


Keeping wildlife in the wild and off dinner plates

Published 01/09/09

NY Assemblyman Greg Ball (R-Patterson) promised to introduce legislation in Albany to "combat bush meat" — entrees named for their origins, which is mostly the African forest, or bush. The legislation would aim to keep elephants, chimpanzees, gorillas, forest antelope and other African and Asian creatures off American plates, helping curtail what some say is a major threat to wildlife and ecosystems around the world. Bush meat also poses a health risk, said Adam Roberts of Born Free USA, an animal advocacy group. Bush-meat consumption has been linked to the transmission of HIV, Ebola and foot-and-mouth disease. Roberts is helping Ball formulate his legislation.

Assemblyman Ball aims to halt bush-meat sales
Michael Risinit
The Journal News

A bad year for animals

Published 01/06/09

2008 was a rotten year for many people. And it wasn't only humans who had a hard time. What started as a lark, a review of animal-related news in 2008, [in San Bernardino County,] turned into the discovery that the year's stories of pets and wild creatures were occasionally uplifting, but were often tales of struggle and pain.

Nearly all of the incidents in this story touch on issues that concern Born Free USA.

2008 was a year to forget, even for animals
Andrew Edwards
The Sun (San Bernardino, CA)

2009 — A reason to hope

Published 12/26/08
By Will Travers, Chief Executive Officer

The last days of 2008. A new year, full of promise, expectation — and uncertainty — looms. What will it hold? Dreams come true or dreams shattered?

Without doubt, the coming months will turbulent. The hopes of half the world seem to rest on the shoulders of President-elect Obama, hope for a new way of doing things, a new sense of humanity and compassion, a kinder and more inclusive world.

Read More

Fighting for Tigers

Published 12/26/08

Adam Roberts, Senior Vice President of Born Free USA united with API, writes for the Encyclopaedia Brittanica on global threats to wild tiger populations — including habitat degradation and loss, hunting by humans, and the international black market in tiger parts and products made from them.

Fighting for Tigers
Adam Roberts
Encyclopaedia Brittanica
Advocacy for Animals

New law bans body-gripping traps

Published 12/23/08

The Guelph (Ontario, Canada) City council unanimously approved a bylaw banning body-gripping traps, moving to informally name it Harper's bylaw after the Jack Russell terrier that suffocated in a trap on industrial lands. Harper died in his owner's arms in December 2006 with his head trapped in a Conibear body-gripping trap. This spurred the community to action and motivated council to direct a committee and staff to draft the ban. ... The bylaw bans all body-gripping traps, which have the intention to kill.

You can pass such a law in your area as Born Free USA united with API guides you through every step of the process.

Body-gripping trap ban unanimously approved
Nicole O'Reilly
Guelph Mercury

Get Billy the elephant out of the L.A. Zoo

Published 12/18/08

In a December 9 Los Angeles Times column, "Zoos without elephants would be a loss for the children of L.A.,” Hector Tobar protests the possibility that Billy, a 23-year-old Malaysian elephant held captive at the Los Angeles Zoo for nearly two decades, might go to a sanctuary and the zoo's exhibit might be closed forever. Three writers compassionately rebut his column.

Born Free USA united with API was founded, in part, on a mission to keep elephants out of zoos.

Zoos without elephants: a lesson in compassion
Lori Marino, Gay Bradshaw, and Randy Malamud
Los Angeles Times Opinion

Shorter Lives for Zoo Elephants

Published 12/12/08

Living in a zoo shortens an elephant's life, according to a new research study published in the journal Science.

Born Free USA united with API is firm in its position that elephants do not belong in zoos.

Zoo Elephants Live A Shortened Life, Study Finds
Joe Palca
National Public Radio

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