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Animal News

Crates of endangered reptiles abandoned at South Africa airport

Published 03/07/08

Three animal transport crates containing endangered reptiles were found abandoned at Oliver Tambo Airport in Johannesburg. The crates, destined for the Czech Republic, were taken to the Johannesburg Zoo and unpacked. Contrary to the consignment listing lizards and frogs, the crates contained hundreds of snakes, geckos, lizards, chameleons, and arthropods,. About 10 to 15 percent of the animals had died during the five to six days they had been in the crates. More were expected to die of dehydration during the following days.

Reptiles abandoned at OR Tambo
The Times

Dogs shot after being caught in traps

Published 03/06/08

Tammy Lewis thought it was strange when her dog, Jeezy, went missing. The 11-month-old puppy usually did not wander far from her home. He mostly remained around the house, playing with his older brother. "Most of the time they stayed in the yard, they really didn't go anywhere," Lewis said. "But one day they were gone." The next day the family went looking for the lost dog. They trudged through the woods as far as a half-mile from home, but found no sign of him. A week later Lewis's neighbor told her why. Her dog was dead. And so was his bluetick coonhound.

Dog Owners Shocked, Saddened By Shootings
Kevin Allen
Rappahannock News

More tormenting of zoo animals

Published 03/05/08

A 17-year-old and a 14-year-old were arrested at the Cohanzick Zoo in New Jersey after witnesses saw and heard them shoot at a rare white Bengal tiger and a black Asiatic bear. The boys were charged on multiple weapons counts. In addition, the SPCA signed charges against both boys for tormenting an animal. Neither of the animals was seriously injured.

Two teens shoot bear, tiger at N.J. zoo
Sam Wood
Philadelphia Inquirer

Illegal traps claim another victim

Published 03/04/08

It was supposed to be a quiet morning walk with the family dogs before the Super Bowl ...

Pets fall prey to illegal traps
Elizabeth Shaw
The Flint Journal

Extinction Trade

Published 03/03/08

Endangered animals are the new blood diamonds as militias and warlords use poaching to fund death.

Extinction Trade
Sharon Begley
Newsweek

More trouble at the San Francisco Zoo

Published 02/29/08

Two months after a Siberian tiger mauled three men at the San Francisco Zoo — resulting in the death of one of them — two other men were allegedly caught late Thursday throwing acorns at the zoo's two black rhinos. Zoo officials said the rhinos, which are endangered, did not appear agitated by the incident. "I'm so glad the system works well," zoo spokesman Paul Garcia said, referring to the emergency hotline phones that were installed after the maulings by Tatiana the tiger on Christmas Day. (There is no reference int he news story to the use of the hotline phones.)

Man cited for allegedly throwing acorns at San Francisco Zoo's rhinos
Linda Goldston
San Jose Mercury News

Exotic Pet Amnesty Day

Published 02/28/08

With alternately tearful goodbyes and barely contained impatience, more than 100 South Floridians surrendered their unwanted exotic animals at the Miami MetroZoo on Saturday. The Exotic Pet Amnesty Day event was designed to give owners a safer alternative to turning the critters loose. Of the more than 150 pets handed over, all but six found new homes.

It's A Zoo Out There: Event Collects 150 Exotic Pets
Rasha Madkour
Associated Press

A sanctuary where many animals died in a recent fire has no USDA license

Published 02/27/08

An animal sanctuary where nearly 100 animals died in a fire last month remains open despite not being licensed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, records show. A consent order filed Aug. 14, 2006, states that Safari Joe's Wildlife Ranch, also known as Safari Joe's Exotic Wildlife Rescue, owned by Joe Estes, has a history of violations, according to the USDA. An administrative law judge ruled that Estes had committed at least 39 violations of the federal Animal Welfare Act.

Embattled animal ranch is still open
Jeff Billington
Tulsa World

The USDA won't enforce the Animal Welfare Act

Published 02/26/08

In 2006, a big cat owner who provided exotic animals for Hollywood movies was killed and partially devoured by one of her tigers. Authorities reported the tiger that killed her was 100 pounds underweight. Less than a year earlier, the USDA cited her for failing to prove her animals were “being fed an adequate diet.” And that’s all the agency did ...

A paper tiger: USDA cited Sandstone owner of underfed tigers — and never followed up before attack
Duluth News Tribune

A local newspaper profiles our CEO, Will Travers

Published 02/25/08

At age 5, Will Travers spent a year in Africa while his parents – Bill Travers and Virginia McKenna – were starring in a movie about efforts to return a lioness to the wild. Released in 1966, "Born Free" was an instant classic with a lasting impact, raising the public's consciousness about animal welfare through the beloved lioness Elsa. The movie had a lasting impact on Will Travers, too. He is the chief executive officer of Born Free U.S.A. united with Animal Protection Institute, a nonprofit based in Sacramento. The organization, which began in November with the merger with API, tackles many animal issues, among them the plight of animals in zoos.

For activist, it’s lions and tigers and cares
Blair Anthony Robertson
Sacramento Bee

Animals in Entertainment: Cruel Spectacles

Published 02/21/08

From Pedicab News: "Although many of us may have fond memories of a day at the circus when we were young, we are largely unaware of what those amusing moments for us cost the captive animals in a lifetime of abuse that is hidden from the public." The video on the website linked below shows elephants riding tricycles in an Asian circus, with reference to the campaign of Born Free USA united with API. "In Thailand," continues the text, "as in many other eastern nations, elephants have been used as work animals for centuries. However, since the Industrial Revolution, their use in industry has been justifiably diminished, but exploiting them for enslaved showmanship serves no useful purpose, at all."

Elephants on Trikes
Pedicab News

Young elephant’s pregnancy brings criticism on zoo

Published 02/14/08

Sydney’s Taronga Zoo is celebrating the news that its 9-year-old Asian elephant is pregnant, but animal rights groups said that there was little conservation benefit in Thong Dee’s pregnancy and that the young elephant faced health risks. “We know that calves born in zoos have double the mortality rate in the wild, and this pregnancy will put both mother and calf at great risk,” siad the chief scientist with Australia’s Royal Society for the Protection of Cruelty to Animals (RSCPA).

Young Sydney elephant’s pregnancy sparks protests
Paris Maggs-Smith
Reuters

Applying the law to deadly pet food

Published 02/06/08

Two Chinese businesses and a U.S. company were indicted on Wednesday, February 6, in the tainted pet food incidents that killed dozens of animals last year and raised worries about products made in China. In a related story, one pet food maker was ordered to pay $3.1 million in compensation. Born Free USA united with API’s “What’s Really in Pet Food” report discusses the history of pet food recalls, and much more about the pet food industry.

U.S. Indicts 3 Firms In Tainted Pet Food Cases
CBS News

An improvement for animals in California pet shops

Published 02/05/08

An investigation into 64 California pet shops, conducted by API in Spring 2007, revealed significant area of animal neglect. In October, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Assembly Bill 1347, the Pet Store Animal Care Act, which imposes stricter standards for the daily care of all animals sold in stores, not just cats and dogs. As Born Free USA united with API’s Monica Engebretson explains, inspections are “complaint-driven, so it requires concerned citizens to call attention to the stores.”

New state law on pet shops imposes stricter standards of care
Stephanie Hoops
Ventura County Star (Camarillo, CA)

An accident waiting to happen

Published 01/24/08

For a £160 fee, Paradise Wildlife Park in Hertfordshire, UK, allows customers to stroke with their fingers Rocky, a 9-year-old Siberian and Bengal tiger cross. The park also permits customers to feed Narnia, a white tiger. Meat is held up to the bars so it can be pulled into the cage. Will Travers, CEO of Born Free USA, said: “These are wild animals. This is an accident waiting to happen.”

Wildlife park lets you pet tiger for £160
Daniel Foggo and Holly Watt
The Sunday Times

“The Exotic Pet Trade” on the radio

Published 01/16/08

Adam Roberts, Senior Vice President of Born Free USA united with API, joins Animal Wise Radio hosts Mike Fry and Beth Nelson for a lively discussion of the exotic pet trade.

Other issues touched upon include the combining of Born Free USA with API, National Bird Day, and Adam's forthcoming participation in the Mount Kenya “10 to 4" Mountain Bike Challenge.

Listen by clicking the control below.

Marking the plight of exotic birds

Published 01/14/08

Not every wild bird is free to fly. Avian advocate groups say that while the U.S. has enacted laws to protect our native birds — such as blue jays, cardinals and crows — from commercial exploitation, the bird pet industry is still able to sell and exploit exotic birds and parrots that hail from other countries, says this news story on the bird population in New York City that quickly moves to coverage of National Bird Day.

Giving feathered friends a lift
Amy Sacks
New York Daily News

How high can tigers jump?

Published 01/10/08

Among the questions experts are now asking: How high can tigers jump? And have zoos and sanctuaries dangerously underestimated tigers? That is to say: Are the walls high enough? One can see in the accompanying slide show just how barren the tiger enclosure at the San Francisco Zoo is.

Experts Debate Tiger Safety After Fatal SF Mauling
cbs5.com (KPIX-TV, San Francisco)

The intensely boring life of tigers in zoos

Published 01/08/08

Tigers are among zoo visitors’ favorite animals. They’re also one reason many people hate zoos. Saddened by the picture of misery presented by the tiger who repetitively paces back and forth, back and forth, some people never go back. “Tigers simply don’t belong in the zoo,” says Adam Roberts, senior vice president of the animal advocacy organization Born Free USA. “Tigers don’t belong on concrete, tigers don’t belong behind bars, and frankly, tigers don’t belong near people.”

Tigers don’t belong in zoos
Susan McCarthy
Salon.com

Born Free USA’s Adam Roberts argues against zoos

Published 12/27/07

The Christmas Day tiger mauling at the San Francisco Zoo that killed a 17-year-old boy and severely injured two men has ignited a national debate about whether wild animals should be held in captivity.

Should Animals Be Held in Captivity?
Good Morning America

FDA Urged to Respect Will of Congress and Maintain Moratorium on Cloning

Published 12/20/07

API members and supporters were among the 150,000 concerned constituents who told the FDA there was an essential need for a more complete assessment of the public health, animal welfare, and economic impacts of cloning animals for food before the agency makes its final decision. Here’s the latest news.

Consumers May Receive Unwelcome Gift This Holiday Season
American Anti-Vivisection Society press release

Monkey returned to human “Mommy” after 7 months in the zoo

Published 12/11/07

A judge orders the return of a confiscated Capuchin monkey kept as a “pet.” Nowhere in this news story is it mentioned that keeping such animals as “pets” is misguided and shows ignorance of the true behavior of monkeys.

No More Monkeying Around
Ernesto Londoño
Washington Post

Maggie's Walk on the Wild Side

Published 11/27/07

Alaska's favorite expatriate, Maggie the elephant, has her own 10-minute workout video.

Maggie joins California culture with sunshine workouts
Beth Bragg
Anchorage Daily News

A Letter to the Editor exposes circus cruelty

Published 11/09/07

“Do you think that most kids would want to go to the circus if they knew that the elephants were shocked, prodded and punctured with bullhooks in order to make them perform?” writes a woman who protested at a Ringling Bros. circus performance on behalf of API. “I think that if most kids had any idea of what goes on behind the scenes at Ringling Brothers, they would end up in tears, which, in my opinion, is the natural human response to learning about circus’ animal barbarism.”

Free the circus animals
Emily Bragonier
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Weekend Feedback

The international trade in exotic pets must be stopped

Published 11/05/07

The international trade in exotic pets such as monkeys, crocodiles and rats must be stopped if human beings are to be protected from global pandemics, a leading microbiologist has cautioned. Online comments on this news story include one from API’s Monica Engebretson.

Booming trade in exotic pets ‘could cause a pandemic’
Melanie Reid
The Times (London)

Maggie the elephant at last leaves the Alaska Zoo

Published 11/02/07

After living nearly her whole life in Alaska, Maggie the elephant was loaded and locked into a special metal crate Thursday at the Alaska Zoo and transported in a C-17 cargo plane to Travis Air Force Base in Fairfield. Her new home will be the Performing Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) in San Andreas, where she will have 30 acres to share with nine other elephants.

Maggie the Elephant is making way to new home in Calaveras County
Associated Press
San Jose Mercury News

Other Maggie stories:

Air Force gives Alaska’s only elephant a lift to warmer climes
Associated Press
Boston Herald

Air Force agrees to move elephant on C-17
Bruce Rolfsen
Air Force Times

Alaskan elephant finds her place in the sun
Dan Glaister
The Guardian

Why zoos fail at species conservation

Published 10/31/07

You can no more save a species by breeding it in a zoo than you can by retrieving DNA from a museum specimen, or implanting embryos of wild cattle species into domestic cattle. A mammoth recovered from DNA (if it can be) is no longer a mammoth, a tiger bred in a zoo is no longer a tiger.

Rattling the cages
David Horton
The Huffington Post

Circus elephants help spread drug-resistant TB

Published 10/30/07

All the evidence indicates that for the last 14 years TB positive and TB infected elephants have been traveling the country and performing in closed arenas full of little kids holding cotton candy and squealing with delight. People with compromised immune systems and the elderly are circus patrons. It's a family tradition in some homes to go to the circus when it's in town.

Idiocracy: Why the Media Is Not Protecting the People
Leslie Griffith
The Huffington Post

Lions and tigers seized from dangerous “conservation” organization relocated to accredited sanctuaries

Published 10/24/07

The Siberian Tiger Conservation Association, an Ohio “sanctuary” exposed in 2006 by investigations by API and ABC News 20/20, has gone out of business. The owner of the facility, Diana McCourt, had been operating the facility in violation of USDA regulations and federal law and was recently evicted from the property. She left behind two lions and four tigers, which are now being relocated to accredited sanctuaries where they, and the public, will never be put in danger again.

Animal Groups Rescue Abandoned Lions and Tigers From Ohio Woman
PRNewswire-USNewswire

Why people shouldn’t have exotic “pets”

Published 10/23/07

Residents of Florida’s Isles of Capri face the consequences of a former exotic “pet” released to the wild. Feral iguanas, a species classified as “threatened,” not only eat native flowering plants and fruits, they also burrow next to seawalls to lay their young, causing damage and destruction to the retaining walls. And because they prefer to defecate in or around water, iguanas have been known to take uninvited swims in private and community swimming pools.

Iguanas visit Capri
Ann Hall
Marco Island Sun Times

Ringling fights proposed Massachusetts bullhook ban

Published 10/22/07

Some Beacon Hill lawmakers say they want to protect elephants from mistreatment. Circus officials contend the characterizations are misguided and passage of such a law would mean the "Greatest Show on Earth" would no longer travel to Massachusetts.

Elephant safety bill vs. the circus
BostonNOW

Wichita City Council stands firm on its exotic pet ban

Published 10/17/07

The exotic pet boom in recent years is not a healthy trend. Exotic animals can be cute when they're babies, but they can be a handful once full grown. Many exotic pet owners get in over their heads and aren't equipped to care for these often demanding critters. The animals suffer. "These are wild animals and they need to be in zoos or out in the wild," said Kay Johnson, head of environmental services for the city.

Draw the line on wild pets in city
Randy Scholfield
Wichita Eagle

Prohibit private individuals from importing, trafficking or possessing wild animals

Published 10/16/07

Florida citizens deserve to know what dangerous exotic animals are lurking in their neighborhoods. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is currently taking public comment on the issue of captive exotic wildlife. The best way to protect the public and animals is to prohibit private individuals from importing, trafficking or possessing wild animals.

Got a tiger living next-door? State says you don't need to know
Jennifer Hobgood
South Florida Sun-Sentinel

The Shell of an Elephant

Published 10/12/07

When someone says they see an elephant in America, “They don’t really see what they are. You see the shell of an elephant. You are not seeing an elephant.” Life in the wild for elephants is contrasted with the misery of life in the circus in this story, which also discusses the Animal Protection Institute’s lawsuit against Ringling for violations of the Endangered Species Act for its treatment of elephants.

Life of a Circus Elephant
Jennifer Davidson
Sacramento News & Review

Maine implements trapping changes after API wins lawsuit

Published 10/11/07

Commissioner Roland D. Martin announced that two changes to Maine's trapping regulations were unanimously approved by the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife. The changes in rule were the result of a settlement in a lawsuit between the department and the Animal Protection Institute concerning the trapping of lynx.

DIF&W sets new trapping rules
Kennebec Journal & Morning Sentinel

Sickened by Ringling’s insistence in using wild animals

Published 10/10/07

A Letter to the Editor emphasizes that "elephants, lions, tigers, and other animals that cannot be domesticated should never be forced to endure the lives that these circus animals must endure. Please take your kids to an animal-free, cruelty-free circus instead."

Circus animal abuse
Christie Greene
Denver Post Opinion

A “pet” bear returns to the wild

Published 10/09/07

Faced with rising costs of maintaining his animal, the caretaker of a 5-year-old black bear releases his “pet” to the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Colorado.

Ben the bear finds a home, and now everybody's happy
Marc Hansen
Des Moines Register

Maine settles API lawsuit by agreeing to restrict trapping

Published 10/05/07

The state has agreed to restrict trapping in northern Maine to protect Canada lynx. The commissioner of Maine’s Department of Inland Fisheries & Wildlife signed a consent decree Thursday to settle a lawsuit by the Animal Protection Institute that claimed the agency is liable for lynx that accidentally get injured or killed by traps set for other animals.

Trapping restricted to protect Canada lynx
John Richardson
Portland Press Herald

Protest targets largest circus in Switzerland

Published 10/04/07

Protests against circuses that use animals are not confined to the United States, nor just to English-speaking countries. In Switzerland, a peaceful demonstration of 100 people, some dressed as polar bears and clowns, decried the use of animals by the Knie circus after it pitched its big top tent on Lausanne’s waterfront.

Animal activists protest circus
24 heures

Diseased dead animals become “protein meal” for farm-animal feed

Published 10/03/07

All of the dead animals in California are added to the feed of chicken, fish, beef, shrimp, etc., which we humans eat every day. Virtually all of the animals killed in shelters and veterinary clinics, road kill, medical laboratories, feed lots, deceased wildlife, etc., are sent to one company, West Coast Rendering in Vernon, CA, where they are piled up and left to decompose for days before being “rendered” into a saleable product.

Food Poisoning: You Are Eating California’s Dead Pets!
MMDNewswire.com

Going veggie is the most effective way to ‘go green’

Published 10/02/07

A kilogram of beef is responsible for more greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution than driving for 3 hours while leaving all the lights on back home, says a Japanese study assessing the effects of beef production on global warming, water acidification and eutrophication, and energy consumption. Quoted in the news story is Su Taylor of the Vegetarian Society in the UK, who says, “Everybody is trying to come up with different ways to reduce carbon footprints. But one of the easiest things you can do is to stop eating meat.” The Animal Protection Institute is included in the story’s Related Links.

Meat is murder on the environment
“Living Green”
News10

Judge says Maine appears to be violating ESA

Published 10/01/07

A federal judge told attorneys for the state Friday that Maine appears to be violating the Endangered Species Act by allowing trapping that could harm Canada lynx. U.S. District Court Judge John Woodcock did not make a ruling on whether the state can be held liable whenever one of the federally protected wildcats is caught inadvertently in traps set for other animals. But the judge made clear that he believes the state has an uphill battle in the lawsuit filed by the Animal Protection Institute. If successful, the suit could dramatically affect — or even bring to a halt — trapping throughout much of central and northern Maine.

Judge says state could be liable for lynx trappings
Kevin Miller
Bangor Daily News

Wild animals killed to stock university natural history museum

Published 09/27/07

The Humane Society of the United States has asked California State University trustees to investigate how many animals were killed to stock a proposed natural history museum at Sacramento State. In 2004 and 2006, the president of California State University, Sacramento, wrote to Tanzania’s director of wildlife seeking permission for two potential donors (an auto dealer and his wife) to hunt 84 different species (a number of them endangered) for a now-abandoned natural history museum. The auto dealer has stated that he and his wife killed a few dozen of the animals listed in the letters during two hunting trips to Tanzania.

Probe hunts, trustees urged
Humane Society decries killing of proposed CSUS museum specimens
Carrie Peyton Dahlberg
Sacramento Bee

Florida should ban the import and sale of exotic pets

Published 09/26/07

A reader’s response to a Florida newspaper article on an escaped monitor lizard calls for state legislation to ban the import and sale of exotic “pets.” She says, “Raising animals in captivity does not make them tame. These are not domesticated animals; they are wild animals who belong in their natural habitat. Wild animals in captivity represent a public-safety risk, a health risk and a welfare concern for the animals.” Her sentiments are wholly consistent with API’s Exotic “Pets” campaign.

No room for exotics
Heather Carpenter
Orlando Sentinel

Minneapolis council rejects circus ban

Published 09/25/07

The Minneapolis City Council has decided against banning wild animal circuses from the city. During last Friday’s city council meeting, members decided to put more regulations and supervision on the circuses and will send the topic back to committee for further study before anything will change. Once the committee drafts new legislation, the city council will consider increased regulations, but for now, nothing changes.

Minneapolis council rejects circus ban
KARE 11 TV
Minneapolis - St. Paul

Animal-free circus impresses local festival audiences and organizers

Published 09/24/07

The Peru Circus, a youth program for Miami County (Indiana) residents ages 7 to 21, wowed audiences this weekend during the Chesterfield Days festival. “It was the first time we had a circus, but it’ll be here every year from now on,” said a festival organizer. The 200-member circus has only three paid employees, operating almost completely by volunteers. The circus is also animal-free.

Circus leaves impression on Chesterfield
The Herald Tribune

New Emergency Regulations Will Minimize Chance Dogs Will Be Caught in Traps

Published 09/21/07

New York State has issued emergency regulations that tighten the guidelines for body-gripping traps, minimizing “the chance that dogs will inadvertently be caught in these traps, while maintaining their effectiveness in catching targeted animals.” Opponents to a ban have argued that the so-called “havahart” traps — which cage the animals — are too difficult to transport to be economically viable, and can cause injury (broken teeth, broken limbs) to animals attempting to escape from them.

New York Looks at Trapping Laws
Northender.com

Protestors Urge Deerfield Residents to “Skip The Circus”

Published 09/20/07

When the Kelly Miller Circus arrived in the village of Deerfield, IL, local protesters encouraged everyone to skip the circus. Besides stressing in detail the abuse suffered by animal performers, protesters raised another safety concern, citing on their website an incident last summer where an employee of the circus was convicted of rape charges involving a 14-year-old girl who attended a Kelly Miller Circus performance in New York. Deerfield therefore amended Kelly Miller’s circus permit to include a background check on all employees who would be spending the night. After learning this, the Kelly Miller Circus informed the village that it would pack up after the last show and move on.

Protestors Urge Deerfield To 'Skip The Circus'
Katie McCall
cbs2chicago.com

No Circus in Deerfield
www.skipthecircus.com

Alaska Zoo's only elephant to be released to sanctuary

Published 09/18/07

Maggie, the sole elephant resident of the Alaska Zoo, is at last headed for the PAWS sanctuary in California. Animal rights groups, including API, had been actively campaigning for a better life for Maggie who, besides being alone since her companion died in 1997, has suffered ill health: twice this last May fire crews had to lift her to her feet.

Maggie's bound for California elephant refuge
James Halpin
Anchorage Daily News

Program to Trap, Kill Animals Starts Again

Published 09/17/07

After a five-year hiatus, a San Benito County Wildlife Services program to trap and kill coyotes, feral pigs, and other animals that encroach on local farms and urban lands is active again. API organized a campaign that convinced the County Board of Supervisors to cancel the program in 2002, but in June 2007 the supervisors voted to bring it back.

Program to Trap, Kill Animals Starts Again
Anthony Ha
Hollister Free Lance

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