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Born Free USA Global Field Projects

Saving Lions in Kenya

Published 08/01/12
By David Manoa, programs officer, Born Free Kenya

Since the inception of Born Free’s exciting "lion-proof boma" project in 2010, a total of 60 bomas have been constructed. Community members throughout Kenya’s Amboseli-Tsavo ecosystem have benefitted from enhanced protection for their livestock from predators such as lions, hyenas, cheetahs and jackals. These predators have, as a result, been spared from persecution by the Maasai communities.

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Ranchers Can Rest Easier Now in Amboseli

Published 07/06/11

The 10-day project begins.
More lion-proof boma project images

Born Free and the Kenya Wildlife Service travelled to Amboseli in the first week of December 2010 and with the help of the community, launched a massive project that will see approximately 7000 livestock being protected from the predators such as lions, hyenas and cheetahs. The project is now complete, all within 10 days! About 600 community members have benefitted.

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About Lion-Proof Bomas

Published 07/06/11

A completed lion-proof boma.
More lion-proof boma project images

One of the major threats to lion populations is predation of livestock. When lions attack and kill livestock, the pastoralist community often retaliate by spearing and poisoning the lions. To help solve this problem, Born Free is using funds to carry out community outreach campaigns and construct lion-proof bomas around Amboseli National Park. This project is being undertaken in partnership with the Kenya Wildlife Service, Living with Lions, Kenya Wildlife Trust and the Amboseli community. Four such bomas have already been constructed at Risa, Meshanani, Olgulului and Injakta villages.

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Lion Bomas in Kenya

Published 07/05/11
By Adam Roberts, Executive Vice President

Kenyans work on a lion-proof boma.
More lion-proof boma project images

Lion (Panthera leo) populations in Kenya are becoming increasingly threatened. The Kenya Wildlife Service has identified a number of lion conservation “hotspots,” including Amboseli, Tsavo and Samburu, where one of the most immediate and serious threats to these species is conflict with humans.

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