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Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus Fact Sheet

Performing captive wildlife — elephants, lions, tigers, bears, baboons, monkeys, camels, llamas — all endure years of physical and psychological pain and suffering in traveling acts to “entertain” an uninformed audience.

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Circus Gatti Fact Sheet

Performing captive wildlife — elephants, lions, tigers, bears, baboons, monkeys, camels, llamas — all endure years of physical and psychological pain and suffering in traveling acts to “entertain” an uninformed audience.

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Commercial Fishing in a State of Collapse

The majority of the world’s fisheries are in a state of collapse.

Too many boats are chasing too few fish. Many of the fish species currently in decline serve as important food sources for sea animals who, unlike humans, have no other food choices. In the Bering Sea, the effects of overfishing on marine animals are obvious. Fur-seal populations have not increased despite a long-standing ban on commercial hunting. The number of Steller’s sea lions, which feed mostly on pollack (the number one ingredient in frozen fish sticks and served by fast food chains), has plunged 80% since the 1970s, and seabirds such as the red-legged kittiwake are also in trouble.1

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Cole Brothers Circus Fact Sheet

(formerly Clyde Beatty-Cole Bros. Circus)

Performing captive wildlife — elephants, lions, tigers, bears, baboons, monkeys, camels, llamas — all endure years of physical and psychological pain and suffering in traveling acts to “entertain” an uninformed audience.

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Carson & Barnes Circus Fact Sheet

Performing captive wildlife — elephants, lions, tigers, bears, baboons, monkeys, camels, llamas — all endure years of physical and psychological pain and suffering in traveling acts to “entertain” an uninformed audience.

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United States Department of Agriculture's Position Statement

Large Wild and Exotic Cats Make Dangerous Pets

Source: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service
Miscellaneous Publication No. 1560

Large wild and exotic cats such as lions, tigers, cougars, and leopards are dangerous animals. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) believes that only qualified, trained professionals should keep these animals, even if they are only to be pets. Care and handling of these wild and exotic cats should be left to trained professionals who have the knowledge and means to maintain them properly.

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Poll: Americans Strongly Oppose Trapping on National Wildlife Refuges

A national public opinion survey conducted by pollster Decision Research for the Animal Protection Institute (API) reveals that Americans are strongly opposed to the trapping of wild animals on National Wildlife Refuges. The refuge system, currently comprised of 529 units covering more than 93 million acres, was established nearly one hundred years ago as a haven for endangered species and a wide variety of plant and animal life. The API survey demonstrates the public's ongoing commitment to that mission and its opposition to refuge practices, such as trapping and hunting, that kill animals for sport or profit.

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The Destructive Dairy Industry

How has milk production changed since the 1950s?

Intensive dairy practices and modified feeds have enabled U.S. dairy cows to produce 2.5 times as much milk today as they did in the 1950s. These intensive practices place dairy cattle under enormous stress to produce an abnormally large amount of milk, 10-20 times the amount of milk they need to suckle their calves. As a result, dairy cattle "burn out" at a much younger age than their normal life span or even the life span of a milk-producing dairy cow in the 1950s and consequently are culled and slaughtered at an early age.

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