Home Page Home | Search Search | Online Store Store | Donate Donate | RSS Feeds RSS Feeds |  


Eco-Friendly Totes

Articles:

Cormorants: So ... What Do Real Scientists Say?

Published 01/25/11
By Barry Kent MacKay, Senior Program Associate

Double-breasted cormorant
(Painting by Barry Kent MacKay)

For the past 200 years there have been numerous studies of double-crested and other species of cormorants, both in North American and abroad, a large number of them designed to examine the “impact” cormorants have on various fish species. In response to FEIS, the American Ornithologists Union (AOU) struck a panel of ornithologists, not exclusive of wildlife management interests but decidedly academic, to review the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s management plan of 2003. They did a massive literature review and stated:

Read More

Cormorants: Footnotes

Published 01/25/11

Double-breasted cormorant
(Painting by Barry Kent MacKay)

1 Another alien fish species who had a profound effect on the Great Lakes is the sea lamprey. This eel-like fish entered the Great Lakes sometime around 1830, through canals that allowed it to move inland from the Atlantic Ocean, but is probably not native. It is a jawless, parasitic fish who attaches a sucker-like mouth to the sides of fish, draining them of bodily fluids, thus slowly killing them. It is believed to have taken a particular toll on the native lake trout.

Read More

The Brown Bear in Canada

Published 10/15/10
By Barry Kent MacKay, senior program associate

The brown bear is almost always called the “grizzly” bear in both Canada and the United States, although one race, found on Kodiak and nearby islands in Alaska, often is popularly known as the “Kodiak bear.”

Read More

The Polar Bear in Canada

Published 09/15/10
By Barry Kent MacKay, senior program associate

Surely one of the most iconic species of wildlife to inhabit Canada is the polar bear. Along with the beaver, moose, loon, eagle and wolf it is among the native wildlife species most often portrayed and easily identified by Canadians. But very few Canadians have seen one outside of zoos. Those who have are often eco-tourists who have made the trek to Churchill, Manitoba, on the west shore of Hudson Bay, which is an immense inland sea of 822,324 square kilometers (about 320,000 square miles). Polar bears move up and down that shoreline, their numbers often concentrated in and around the town of Churchill, in the province’s far northeast.

Read More

The Plight of Cormorants in Canada

Published 09/15/10
By Barry Kent MacKay, senior program associate

Few attacks against wildlife are more irrational and bloody than the effort being made in Canada and the United States to kill off large numbers of double-crested cormorants while they are nesting. In Canada, Born Free USA is one of several animal protection and conservation organizations that are founding members of Cormorant Defenders International (CDI), which is dedicated to the protection of cormorants and other waterbirds that nest in colonies from culls. Our focus has been the lower Great Lakes, where both the federal and provincial governments have instigated culling of many thousands of birds while they are nesting.

Read More

The American Black Bear in Canada

Published 09/15/10
By Barry Kent MacKay, senior program associate

The American black bear is the most “successful” of the modern bears. Indeed, with a very roughly estimated population of about 900,000, there are something like three times more American black bears in the world than there are individuals of all other bear species combined.

Read More

DECISION 2010: Life or Death for the World’s Wildlife

From Animal Issues, Volume 40 Number 4, Winter 2009

Published 11/16/09
By Adam M. Roberts, Senior Vice President

Are we prepared to return to the killing fields of the 1970s and 1980s, when hundreds of thousands of elephant carcasses littered the African savannah, their faces literally sawn off for their bloody ivory tusks?

Read More

When You Least Expect It SNAP! Traps Maim and Kill like LANDMINES

From Animal Issues, Volume 40 Number 1, Spring 2009

Published 03/16/09
By Barbara Schmitz, Senior Program Associate

Excruciating pain. Lost limbs. Even death. These are the results of trapping ... not only for the wild animals whose furs are stripped from their bodies, but also for family dogs and cats and even endangered species who are “incidentally” caught in the remorseless jaws of leghold traps, Conibear traps, or snares (cable nooses).

Read More

Articles Index   Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next

rss Subscribe   subscribe Updates by Email

Articles