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Articles:

What to Look For in an Ecotour

Published 05/13/14

According to the World Travel and Tourism Council, travel and tourism is projected to remain one of the world's biggest industries, generating more than $3.5 trillion in economic activity annually. Ecotourism is one of the most rapidly growing and dynamic sectors of the tourism market.

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2012 Wildlife Photo Contest: The Winners!

Published 07/18/12

Minnesotans dominated our second annual Keep Wildlife in the Wild Photo Contest, as Anne Girton of Edina captured first place and Susan Winkelman of Minneapolis was runner-up.

For her winning entry, a picture of a cedar waxwing taken June 2, 2012, in Chaska, Girton will receive a Born Free USA merchandise gift basket. Winkelman tells us her fox photo was taken on June 2, 2012, about 20 miles west of Minneapolis.

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2012 Essay Contest: The Winners!

"How I'm Going Wild for Animals This Summer"

Published 07/17/12

As part of Keep Wildlife in the Wild Month 2012, Born Free USA sponsored its first ever "How I'm Going Wild for Animals This Summer" essay contest for students. We had three categories — ages 10 and younger, ages 11 through 14, and ages 15 through 18. Below are the winning entries. Each winner will receive a certificate, T-shirt, plush animal of choice (we have seven to choose from), a $50 gift certificate to Barnes & Noble, and a free "adoption" from the Born Free USA Primate Sanctuary. The prize package is valued at $142!

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Why Cormorants Can’t Kill All the Fish

Cormorants: An Excuse to Kill

Published 01/25/11
By Barry Kent MacKay, Senior Program Associate

Double-breasted cormorant
(Painting by Barry Kent MacKay)

Most people who believe the double-crested cormorant population in North America, especially in the east, threatens the environment and therefore should be reduced, will not see this document. And if they do, I suspect most will avoid reading it, or other documents about cormorants on this website.

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Bears in Canada — A Primer

Published 01/25/11
By Barry Kent MacKay, senior program associate

There are eight species of bears in the world and at least 44 “extant taxa,” meaning distinct subspecies, or “races.”

A subspecies is a group of animals who are, within the species they belong to, distinctly similar to each other but different, usually in very subtle ways, from other members of the species. Where their populations overlap with another subspecies, they freely interbreed.

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Cormorants: Wildlife Management North and South of the Border

Published 01/25/11
By Barry Kent MacKay, Senior Program Associate

(Photo by Jeff Jones)

Wildlife managers in Canada and the United States both seek to find reasons to kill cormorants in response to pressure from the concerns of sport and commercial fishers who believe that cormorants eat too many fish. In the United States particularly but also in Canada there are the additional concerns of aquaculturists (fish farmers), primarily in the southern States, about cormorants and other piscivorous birds eating their stocks.

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Cormorants: Energy Transference, Basic Physics and the Technology Prosthesis

Published 01/25/11
By Barry Kent MacKay, Senior Program Associate

Double-breasted cormorant
(Painting by Barry Kent MacKay)

To understand why cormorants cannot eliminate fish, one must have at least a very elementary understanding of how all creatures exist. Put simply, we all need to have food that can be converted by our bodies into tissue, energy and warmth. This conversion process is called metabolism, and is a two-part process. Food provides us with the means to create cells and tissues and organs and fats. But the energy we expand in order to acquire food consumes our physical being.

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Cormorants: Back in the Real World

Published 01/25/11
By Barry Kent MacKay, Senior Program Associate

But such absurd scenarios (see Cormorants: Energy Transference, Basic Physics and the Technology Prosthesis) don’t happen in the wild, which is why both fish and cormorants continue to co-exist as they have for millions of years. To be sure, in North America one species of cormorant and several species of fish have been exterminated, but that is because humans, utilizing not their own metabolic energy but the energy derived from their technology, destroyed them.

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